Start Dating heritage guitars

Dating heritage guitars

The first Byrdlands were slim, custom built, L-5 models for guitarists Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Other models such as the ES-350T and the ES-225T were introduced as less costly alternatives. Similar in size to the hollow-body Thinlines, the ES-335 family had a solid center, giving the string tone a longer sustain.

The company was formerly known as Gibson Guitar Corp. By the 1930s, the company was also making flattop acoustic guitars, as well as one of the first commercially available hollow-body electric guitars, used and popularized by Charlie Christian.

Between 19 production of Gibson guitars was shifted from Kalamazoo to Nashville, Tennessee. New production plants were opened in Memphis, Tennessee, as well as Bozeman, Montana.

The Kalamazoo plant kept going for a few years as a custom-instrument shop, but was closed in 1984; several Gibson employees led by plant manager Jim Duerloo established Heritage Guitars in the old factory, building versions of classic Gibson designs. The Memphis facility is used for semi-hollow and custom shop instruments, while the Bozeman facility is dedicated to acoustic instruments.

The new body design then became known as the SG (for "solid guitar"), due to disapproval from Les Paul himself.